Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
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The Atlantic Aerospace, Defence and Security Industry

A high definition version of this video is available on YouTube.

 

Transcript

Zoom in on a map of Atlantic Canada, with the words Atlantic Canada written in white. A yellow line delimits the Canada-US border. Change scene: A man wearing a blue welding helmet welds one of several beams, as sparks fly. He is in a large warehouse with concrete floors. Numbers are written on the beam. A man walks in the background. Change scene: Two men use Virtual Marine Technology’s small craft simulator. There are three screens that show the hull of a simulated ship navigating through rainy weather. One man sits in the back wearing a headset and watches two monitors with maps on them. One man stands in front and steers a wheel located in front of the three screens. Change scene: A man wearing a white hard hat and a woman look at an architectural plan in an office setting. They discuss and point at it. The camera zooms in on the plan. The woman’s hand points to a figure on the plan.

It’s a very diverse industry in Atlantic Canada, from companies that do metal work, to software, to logistics and in-service support; it’s really got a broad spectrum of skills and opportunities for Atlantic companies.

Andrew Hall, Co-Chair of the Atlantic Alliance of Aerospace and Defence Associations stands at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. Booths are in the background and people in business attire are standing in the background, others are walking by.

I think the importance of the region’s aerospace and defence sector is that it offers highly-skilled, high paying jobs, and opportunities in the supply chain of, really, a world market.

Anthony Patterson, President and CEO of Virtual Marine Technology stands in front of the business' booth at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. A video simulation screen in the background shows a ship with fire and smoke coming out of the stern of the ship. People discuss amongst themselves in the background.

The aerospace and defence industry is a key driver on innovation. A key driver on technology development, and is increasingly becoming a key driver in exports.

A man demonstrates how to assemble a section of the small craft simulator. A man shows another man a panel with electrical circuits from inside the small craft simulator. A man turns knobs on the small craft simulator. Zoom in on his hand. He pulls on a throttle. Zoom in on the speedometer, as the pointer goes up to 40. His face is reflected in the speedometer. Focus on the simulator screens. The water is smooth, and ships navigate the calm water. Zoom in on the man's face. Zoom in on his hands as he turns the wheel. The screens show the hull of the ship turning in the simulator screens.

What we see happening is that we will cross over technologies and expertise that we have proven in the oil and gas industry and bring this over into aerospace and defence. Mexico was our first export sales, and we've also branched off into Brazil, and some product sales in Russia.

Zoom in on a still image of two men consulting a plan on a lift next to an airplane in a warehouse setting. Zoom in on a still image of a man in a ball cap wearing safety goggles and using a piece of machinery. Zoom in on a still image of woman wearing white cloth gloves inspecting a machinery part.

Vector Atlantic supports customers worldwide. We have our main facility in Summerside, Prince Edward Island as our main overhaul facility.

Steven Stewart, Director of Strategic Marketing Development, Vector Aerospace, stands at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. Booths are in the background and people in business attire are standing in the background, others are walking by. Switch to front view image of an airplane in a warehouse setting.

We also have service centers in western Canada, the United States, Africa, and we've just recently taken over facilities in Europe, as well as Australia.

Bert Lewis, Business Development Manager at Mulgrave Machine Works, stands at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. Booths are in the background and people in business attire are standing in the background, others are walking by.

Mulgrave Machine Works is a full service metal fabrication and machining company in Mulgrave, Nova Scotia.

In a warehouse, two men in hard hats watch as a machine bends a very large sheet of metal into a cone shape. Sparks fly in the background. Change scene: A man in a welder’s hat welds a beam. Sparks fly.

We do all types of metal fabrication. At Mulgrave machine works we don’t build ships – but we build the components that you would find on ships.

Four men in hard hats and welding visors discuss something then disperse. Change scene: A woman in a hard hat, safety goggles and gear puts away a cord. Change scene: A man welds on top of a large piece of metal. Sparks fly. Change scene: A machine grinds metal. Sparks fly. Zoom out. A man wearing a hard hat and safety goggles supervises the machine. Change scene: Zoom in on a welder cutting a beam. Sparks fly. Change scene: Three men wearing hard hats use grinders on beams. Sparks fly.

For us, success in business basically means what does the customer want – and my advice to other companies would be to figure out what they want and get ready to supply that. That’s going to mean certifications you’re going to need to have, it’s going to mean investments in equipment, and all this is time and money. If you can do that, you’ll be qualified to get into the game, that’s the ticket for admission.

Zoom in on a still aerial image of the New Brunswick Naval Center installations. There are several docks, and warehouses for repair. Zoom in on a still image of a tugboat hoisted up for repair in an outdoor setting. Zoom in on a still image of a commercial fishing boat being hoisted for repairs.

The small businesses in our region know shipbuilding very well: they have worked in the industry for 40 years.

Yvon Cormier, Past Director General, New Brunswick Naval Center, stands at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. Booths are in the background and people in business attire are standing in the background, others are walking by.

They are very active in the auxiliary industry, which is very important in shipbuilding. We have suppliers of motors, transmissions , propellers, and so forth, and companies that work in hydraulics and navigation tools.

Aerial video footage of a cargo ship navigating through calm blue water. The cargo ship is charged with multi-coloured containers. A small boat navigates beside the ship.

There are many small enterprises in our region that could offer their products and services to subcontractors.

Yvon Cormier, Past Director General, New Brunswick Naval Center, stands at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. Booths are in the background and people in business attire are standing in the background, others are walking by.

We are very confident in the future of the shipbuilding industry, especially since the government in Ottawa is going to invest billions and billions of dollars in federal projects over the next 30 years. We are sure we can get our part of that work.

Steven Stewart, Director of Strategic Marketing Development, Vector Aerospace, stands at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. Booths are in the background and people in business attire are standing in the background, others are walking by.

The Aerospace, Defence and Security industry, especially over the past 5 years, has gained a significant foothold in terms of the economies; we can talk about the contribution of GDP and everything else, but the biggest thing I've noticed is that at least two of the provincial governments have identified our industry as a pillar of economic development.

Anthony Patterson, President and CEO of Virtual Marine Technolog,y stands in front of the business' booth at an aerospace and defence convention, and speaks to the camera. A video simulation of a calm port plays on the screen of the company’s small craft simulator in the background.

And I think that as we move forward, especially with the national shipbuilding program, that this is only going to further increase and strengthen the capabilities of Atlantic Canadian firms to participate in the aerospace and defense industry.

White Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency logo on black background. Switch to white Canada logo on black background.

Added: June 19, 2013