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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 

 

Access to Information Act
and
Privacy Act
Annual Report to Parliament

April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009

PREFACE

Established in 1987, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is a federal government institution headquartered in Moncton, New Brunswick. The Agency has regional and field offices in cities and towns across the four Atlantic provinces. These are led by regional vice-presidents located in each provincial capital, who are responsible for the delivery of ACOA programs in their respective provinces. Through its Ottawa office, ACOA ensures that Atlantic Canada’s interests are reflected in both the policies and programs developed by other departments and agencies of the federal government.

ACOA works in partnership with Atlantic Canadians to improve the economy of communities in the region and enhance the region’s competitiveness. Working with partners in government, the private sector, academia and non-governmental organizations, ACOA seeks to advance economic opportunities and innovation in order to serve the needs of businesses, organizations, individuals and communities. This work addresses the Agency’s mandate “to increase opportunity for economic development in Atlantic Canada and, more particularly, to enhance the growth of earned incomes and employment opportunities in that region.”

ACOA delivers a wide variety of programs and services for aspiring entrepreneurs, business owners and managers, non-commercial organizations, communities, as well as academic and research institutions throughout the region.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I:  REPORT ON THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT

1. INTRODUCTION
2. DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY
3. INFO SOURCE
4. READING ROOM
5. EDUCATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES
6. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
7. COMPLAINTS
8. INTERPRETATION OF THE REPORT ON THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT

ANNEX A – ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT DELEGATION INSTRUMENT
ANNEX B – REPORT ON THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT
ANNEX C – SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FOR 2008-2009
ANNEX D – FREQUENCY OF EXEMPTIONS INVOKED AND EXCLUSIONS CITED BY SECTIONS OF THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT

PART II:  REPORT ON THE PRIVACY ACT

1. INTRODUCTION
2. DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY
3. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
4. DATA MATCHING AND SHARING ACTIVITIES
5. EDUCATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES
6. AUTHORIZED DISCLOSURE UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT
7. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
8. INFO SOURCE
9. INTERPRETATION OF THE STATISTICAL REPORT ON THE PRIVACY ACT

ANNEX A – PRIVACY ACT DELEGATION INSTRUMENT
ANNEX B – STATISTICAL REPORT ON THE PRIVACY ACT

PART I:  REPORT ON THE Access to Information Act

1. INTRODUCTION

The Access to Information Act (Revised Statutes of Canada, Chapter A–1, 1985) was proclaimed on July 1, 1983.

The Access to Information Act gives all individuals and corporate entities present in Canada a right of access to records under the control of federal institutions, subject to certain specific and limited exceptions.

Section 72 of the Access to Information Act requires that the head of every government institution shall prepare, for submission to Parliament, an annual report on the administration of the Act within the institution during each financial year.

This annual report is intended to describe how the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) administered its responsibilities in the operation of the Access to Information Act.

The Agency’s mandate is to increase opportunity for economic development in Atlantic Canada and, more particularly, to enhance the growth of earned incomes and employment opportunities in that region.

2. DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY

For the purpose of the Access to Information Act, the President delegated full authority to the Vice President of Finance and Corporate Services, and to the Corporate Secretary, and partial authority to the Director/Coordinator of the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division. A copy of the signed delegation instrument for the Access to Information Act is attached as Annex A.

The ATIP Division, located at ACOA’s Head Office in Moncton, New Brunswick, oversees the administration of the Act. The ATIP Director/Coordinator reports to the Corporate Secretary, who in turn reports to the Vice President of Finance and Corporate Services. The ATIP Division includes three officers and one support staff.

The administration of the legislation within the Agency is also facilitated at the branch and regional office levels. Each organizational sector has a Liaison Officer who coordinates the records retrieval process. The analysis of records is done by ATIP staff, based on the feedback received from staff in the offices of primary interest.

3. INFO SOURCE

The Act requires that the Agency provide a description of its organization, program responsibilities and information holdings in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) publication Info Source – Sources of Federal Government Information. The publication is accessible at www.infosource.gc.ca.

Under the Management Accountability Framework (MAF) Assessment, TBS reported that the Agency had not accurately or comprehensively described its information holdings.

The ATIP Division developed a phased-in approach to restructuring its entire Info Source chapter, based on new directives from the TBS. The first phase involved amending the description of the organizational structure to reflect the Program Activity Architecture (PAA). At the request of senior management, program officials were assigned to work with the ATIP staff on the development of clear and comprehensive classes of records and personal information banks to identify the Agency’s information holdings in its 2009 submission. A formal communication process between staff of Central Registry of ACOA records and ATIP Division has been established to report the creation of new files that should be included in the Info Source publication.

A working group will be established to address the various information management requirements of the ATIP legislation and TBS requirements (MAF and Implementation Report). Program leads as well as representatives from Information Management and Communications will work with the ATIP Division to achieve this objective.

4. READING ROOM

The library at ACOA’s Head Office has been designated as the public reading room for the purpose of reviewing publications and other public materials.

5. EDUCATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES

Awareness sessions on the requirements of the Access to Information Act are made available upon request to all employees of the Agency. No sessions were presented during this fiscal year.

ATIP employees continually sensitize and guide employees, third parties and requesters regarding the requirements of the Access to Information Act, by means of continuous dialogue. During the reporting period, the ATIP employees responded to 24 enquiries from colleagues, where advice and guidance were provided on various subject matters pertaining to Access to Information legislation.

The ATIP Division developed fact sheets to guide ACOA employees and to make them aware of the policy changes with respect to requirements of the Access to Information Act. These are available on ACOA’s intranet site.

During this reporting period, the employees of the ATIP Division participated in various training sessions. These included:  two sessions offered by the TBS via teleconference, attended by one employee; one session offered by the Canada School of Public Service, attended by two employees; and one course offered by a private training organization, attended by one employee. Two ATIP officers also attended two conferences, one sponsored by the University of Alberta and the other by the Canadian Access and Privacy Association. The Agency’s ATIP Director/Coordinator attends all TBS ATIP community meetings.

6. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

It is Agency policy to routinely release, in an informal manner, any information that does not qualify for an exemption or that is not excluded under the Access to Information Act. During the reporting period, the Agency responded to five informal requests. The ATIP staff also reviewed records prepared to respond to 20 written parliamentary questions during this fiscal year.

Proactive Disclosure

The recent requests processed under the Access to Information Act by the Agency are posted verbatim on the Agency’s website. The list focuses on subjects of public interest and is accessible at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/eng/Accountability/AccessToInformation/Pages/ATIPRequests.aspx.

The Agency supports improved accessibility of government information to the public. In this regard, ACOA was one of the first institutions to develop and implement a Web page that provides public access to a database of information on projects approved for funding. The database is accessible at http://pub.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/atip/e/content/default.asp.

Review of Other Records

When records are transferred to Library and Archives Canada (LAC), responsibility for processing requests to access these records is also transferred. In order to facilitate the processing of requests for information, LAC requires that all federal institutions identify information that may be subject to an exemption or exclusion before transferring the records to them. The lists of selective files to be transferred to LAC are reviewed by the Agency’s ATIP officers, who identify the files that may contain information that should not be disclosed. As required, the complete file will be reviewed by ATIP officers.

The ATIP Division reviews all internal audit and evaluation reports before they are posted to the Agency’s website. During this reporting period, ATIP staff reviewed five reports in preparation for publication. Since the requirement was introduced that these reports be published, the ATIP Division has reviewed a total of 27 reports. A list of these reports is accessible at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/eng/Accountability/AuditsAndEvaluations/Pages/home.aspx.

File Management System

In January 2007, the Agency upgraded its file management system to AccessPro Case Management, to replace the ATIPflow system, which was no longer supported by the Privasoft Corporation. The change of system resulted in a number of issues; consultations with Privasoft technicians are ongoing to address these issues.

7. COMPLAINTS

Five complaints were filed against ACOA with the Office of the Information Commissioner (OIC) during fiscal year 2008-2009. These, added to seven ongoing complaints, brought the caseload to 12 active complaint files. Nine complaint files were closed this fiscal year.

One complaint was related to a delay in responding to a request. The OIC determined that the Agency had responded within the legislated timeframe and the file was closed as discontinued.

Another complaint cited the refusal to disclose Cabinet confidences. The Privy Council Office reviewed its initial application of Section 69 of the Act and determined that some of the information could be released. The Agency applied Section 21 to refuse access to part of the information in order to protect the Agency’s internal decision-making process. The OIC agreed with the Agency’s decision and the file was closed as resolved with remedial action taken.

Seven complaints were related to exemptions applied; five were closed as resolved after the Agency agreed to release additional information, and two were closed as resolved after the OIC determined that the Agency had properly applied the Act.

It is expected that the remaining three complaints will be closed once the OIC provides its findings.

There were no applications submitted to the Federal Court or the Federal Court of Appeal regarding the Agency’s administration of the Act.

8. INTERPRETATION OF THE REPORT ON THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT

The following is provided to assist the reader in the interpretation of the information reported in Annex B.

I:  REQUESTS

The Agency’s caseload for 2008-2009 consisted of 47 requests, including 10 requests carried forward from the previous reporting period. During this reporting period, 37 new requests were received. This represents a decrease of 17 requests (26%) in the caseload over the previous year.

The breakdown of requesters is as follow:

 

 

 Media 10
 Academic 3
 Business * 11
 Organization 10
 Public 3

* This category includes known Information Brokers.

During 2008-2009, the Agency received 15 consultations from other governmental institutions and responded to 14 of them within the deadline. The response to the remaining consultation was provided three days late.

II:  DISPOSITION OF REQUESTS COMPLETED

Of the 37 requests completed during 2008-2009, the Agency granted access, in whole or in part, to the records on 33 occasions. Responses to these 33 requests involved the page-by-page review of approximately 9,000 pages of records. Of the remaining four requests:

  • one was unable to be processed as no records existed;
  • two were abandoned by the requester; and
  • one was composed of records exempted in their entirety.

III and IV:  Exemptions Invoked and Exclusions Cited

The two major exemptions invoked during this reporting period were related to the operations of government (Section 21) and third-party information (Section 20). Refer to Annexes C and D for further information regarding this matter.

V and VI:  COMPLETION TIME AND EXTENSIONS

The table below provides details on the completion time for the 37 requests completed by ACOA during 2008-2009.

  • 12 within 30 days or less (32%)
  •  7 within 31 to 60 days (20%)
  •  7 within 61 to 120 days (20%)
  • 11 within 121 days or more (30%)

It is important to note that most requests processed by the Agency require third-party notices pursuant to Sections 27 and 28 of the Act. During the reporting period, a total of 68 such notices were sent to third parties concerned. More than 50% of the third parties consulted did not respond within the period allowed, resulting in longer response delays.

The processing of the 37 requests also required that the Agency initiate 42 consultations with other governmental institutions and four requests for certification of Cabinet confidences by the Privy Council Office.

Extensions beyond the prescribed time limit of 30 days were required in 30 instances where the Agency had to search through a large number of records, consult with other government institutions, and notify third parties pursuant to Section 27 of the Act.

  • 9(1)(a) – searching time: 3
  • 9(1)(b) – consultation: 14
  • 9(1)(c) – notice to third parties: 13

VII:  TRANSLATION

The translation of information requested under the Act was not required during this fiscal year.

VIII:  METHOD OF ACCESS

Where access was granted, the Agency provided copies of records, in whole or in part, to the requesters. The Agency responded to several requests via e-mail to provide records in electronic format as requested.

IX:  FEES

The Access to Information Act authorizes fees for certain activities related to the processing of formal requests under the Act. In addition to a $5 application fee, search, preparation and reproduction charges may also apply. The current fee structure is specified in the Access to Information Regulations. No fees are imposed for reviewing records, overhead or shipping costs. Moreover, in accordance with Section 11 of the Act, no fees are charged for the first five hours required to search for records or to prepare any part of these records for disclosure.
 
In accordance with Treasury Board guidelines, the Agency routinely waives fees under $25. For fees over $25, the Agency examines each request on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the costs of processing each request and the degree of public benefit to be derived from the release of the information. For this fiscal year, the Agency collected a total of only $23 for reproduction fees.

The Agency waived the application fees for six requests that were determined to be in the public interest. A total of $155 was collected for application fees during the reporting period. ACOA also waived other applicable fees, totalling $900, determining that release of the information was in the public interest.

X:  COSTS

In 2008-2009, the direct cost of administering the Access to Information Act, including the cost of providing information and training sessions, totalled $303,871. This amount represents $282,282 in salary costs for 4.57 person-years and $21,589 for administration costs.

ANNEX A

Annex A

 

ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT DELEGATION INSTRUMENT Approved June 29, 2009

Section of the Access to Information Act Vice-President, Finance and Corporate Services Corporate Secretary Director/CoordinatorAccess to Information and Privacy
 7(a) Notice where access requested

X

X

X

8(1) Transfer to/transfer from institution

X

X

9 Extension of time limits

 X

X

X

11(2), (3), (4), (5), (6) Additional fees

 X

X

X

12(2)(3) Language of access and alternative format

 X

X

X

13 Information obtained in confidence

X

X

 
14 Federal-Provincial affairs

X

X

 
15(1) International affairs and defence

X

X

 
16 Law enforcement and investigations

X

X

 
17 Safety of individuals

X

X

 
18 Economic interests of Canada

X

X

 
19 Personal information

X

 
20 Third-party information

X

 
21 Advice

X

X

 

22 Testing procedures

X

 
23 Solicitor/client privilege

X

 
24 Statutory prohibitions

X

 
25 Severance

X

X

26 Information to be published

X

 
27(1)(4) Third-party notification

X

X

28(1)(2)(4) Third-party notification

X

X

29(1) Disclosure on recommendation of Information Commissioner

X

X

 
33 Advise Information Commissioner of third-party involvement

X

X

35(2) Right to make representations

X

X

37(4) Access to be given complainant

X

X

43(1) Notice to third parties (application to Federal Court for review)

X

X

44(2) Notice to applicant (application to Federal Court by third party)

X

X

52(2)&(3) Special rules for hearings

X

X

69 Excluded information

X

 

 

ANNEX B

 

Annex B

ANNEX C

Supplemental Reporting Requirements for 2008-2009

Access to Information Act

Part III – Exemptions Invoked:

Section 13

Subjection 13(e)      0

Section 14

Subsection 14(a)      5

Subsection 14(b)     3

Part IV – Exclusions cited:

Subsection 69.1      0

 

 
ANNEX D

Frequency of exemptions invoked and exclusions cited, by sections of the Access to Information Act
(Please note that the section is only reported once for each request)

 

Section

Description of the Section

Frequency

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

13(1)(a) Information obtained in confidence from a foreign state government

0

1 1
13(1)(c) Information obtained in confidence from a provincial government

1

1

3

 14

Federal-provincial affairs

0

0

3

14(a) Federal-provincial consultations or deliberations

5

2

1

14(b) Strategy to tactics adopted by the Government of Canada relating to fed-prov

3

0

0

15(1) International affairs 

1

0

0

16(1)(a) Law enforcement and investigations

0

0

1

16(1)(c) Law enforcement and investigations 

1

0

16(2) Law enforcement and investigations - Security

 8

2

10

18(b) Economic interests of Canada - Prejudice the competitive position of a government institution

2

5

0

18(d) Economic interests of Canada - Material injurious to the financial interests

0

2

0

19(1) Personal information as defined in the Privacy Act

15

19

33

20(1)(a) Third-party information - Trade secrets of a third party

0

2

3

20(1)(b) Third-party confidential information 

12

15

29

20(1)(c) Third-party information - Financial loss or gain, or could prejudice the competitive position of a third party

8

13

19

20(1)(d) Third-party information - Interference with negotiations of a third party

12

17

25

21(1)(a) Advice or recommendations by or for the government or Minister of the Crown

8

10

13

21(1)(b) Account of consultations or deliberations of government or Minister of the Crown

14

16

24

21(1)(c) Positions or plans for negotiations carried by or on behalf of the Government of Canada

15

11

26

 21(1)(d)

Plans relating to the management of personnel or administration of a government institution not yet put into operation

6

3

4

23

Solicitor-client privilege

7

4

4

24

Statutory prohibitions against disclosure

1

2

2

26 Refusal of access where information to be published

0

1

0

68(a) Act does not apply to certain materials - Materials published or available for purchase by the public

5

3

9

69(1)(a) Confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada - Memoranda

1

2

2

69(1)(c) Confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada - Agenda and Records of Cabinet Deliberations

0

2

1

69(1)(e) Confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada - Records to brief ministers

4

2

0

69(1)(g) Confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada - Records containing information re (a) to (f)

 3

6

5

 

 

PART II:  REPORT ON THE PRIVACY ACT

1. INTRODUCTION

The Privacy Act (Revised Statutes of Canada, 1985, c. P-21) was proclaimed on July 1, 1983.

The Privacy Act gives individuals the right to access and request correction to personal information about themselves held by federal institutions listed in the schedule of the Act. This law also imposes obligations on those institutions to respect privacy rights by limiting the collection, use and disclosure of personal information.

Section 72 of the Privacy Act requires that the head of every government institution shall prepare, for submission to Parliament, an annual report on the administration of the Act within the institution during each financial year.

This annual report is intended to describe how the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) administered its responsibilities in the operation of the Privacy Act.

The Agency’s mandate is to increase opportunity for economic development in Atlantic Canada and, more particularly, to enhance the growth of earned incomes and employment opportunities in that region.

2. DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY

For the purpose of the Privacy Act, the President delegated full authority to the Vice-President of Finance and Corporate Services, and partial authority to the Corporate Secretary and to the Director/Coordinator of the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division. A copy of the signed delegation instrument for the Privacy Act is attached as Annex A.

The ATIP Division, located at ACOA’s Head Office in Moncton, New Brunswick, oversees the administration of the Privacy Act. The ATIP Director/Coordinator reports to the Corporate Secretary, who in turn reports to the Vice-President of Finance and Corporate Services. The ATIP Division includes three officers and one support staff.

The administration of the legislation within the Agency is also facilitated at the branch and regional office levels. Each organizational sector has a Liaison Officer who coordinates the records retrieval process. The analysis of records is done by ATIP staff, based on the feedback received from staff in the offices of primary interest.

3. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

There were no requirements for Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) during this reporting year.

4. DATA MATCHING AND SHARING ACTIVITIES

The Agency was not involved in any new data matching or sharing activities during 2008-2009.

As required, data matching with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is carried out to identify individuals in order to collect a debt owing to Her Majesty in right of Canada, pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(l) of the Privacy Act. This is done between the Agency’s Recovery officials and CRA officials.

Internal data sharing activities are also carried out for recovery purposes, in order to collect a debt owing to Her Majesty in right of Canada. This is done between Programs officers, Recovery officers and Legal Services, as required.

The Agency may also undertake external sharing activities when a client’s file is referred to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) or Justice Canada regarding a possible criminal offence. This sharing is between the Programs officer responsible for the file, the Agency’s Legal Services (Justice Canada) and the RCMP.

For income tax purposes, the Agency shares with CRA the Social Insurance Numbers of members of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Board, and the Atlantic Innovation Fund (AIF) Advisory Board members, as well as Peer Reviewers (for the AIF).

5. EDUCATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES

Awareness sessions on the requirements of the Privacy Act are made available upon request to all employees of the Agency. No sessions were presented during this fiscal year.

The ATIP staff sensitizes and guides the Agency’s employees, third parties and requesters on the requirements of the Privacy legislation, by means of continuous dialogue. During this reporting period, the ATIP Division was consulted on nine occasions for advice and guidance on matters relating to the privacy legislation. A log of each request for advice is kept for reference purpose.

The ATIP Division developed fact sheets to raise awareness of the legislation. The following fact sheets are posted on the Agency’s intranet site.

  • Preventing Identity Theft
  • Privacy in the Workplace
  • Faxing Personal Information
  • How to Access your Personal Information and Lodge a Complaint

During this reporting period, two officers participated in privacy-related education or training activities by attending two conferences, one sponsored by the University of Alberta and the other by the Canadian Access and Privacy Association. The ATIP Director/Coordinator attends all ATIP community meetings organized by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

6. AUTHORIZED DISCLOSURE UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT

During this reporting year, the Agency did not disclose personal information pursuant to paragraphs 8(2)(e), 8(2)(f), 8(2)(g) or 8(2)(m) of the Act.

7. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

There were no significant changes to the Agency’s privacy procedures during this fiscal year.

The ATIP Division developed internal guidelines on privacy breaches, based on the guidelines developed by the TBS. The document provides guidance to Agency employees in order to prevent such incidents and to identify appropriate actions in the event of a privacy breach. This document is posted on the Agency’s intranet site.

8. INFO SOURCE

The Privacy Act requires that the Agency provide a description of personal information holdings for inclusion in the Treasury Board of Canada Info Source – Sources of Federal Government Information publication. The publication is accessible on the Internet at http://infosource.gc.ca/.

Under the Management Accountability Framework (MAF) Assessment, it was determined that the Agency had not accurately and comprehensively described its collection of personal information in the Info Source publication.

The ATIP Division developed a phased-in approach to restructuring its entire Info Source chapter, based on new directives from the TBS. The first phase involved amending the description of the organizational structure to reflect the Program Activity Architecture (PAA). At the request of senior management, program officials were assigned to work with the ATIP staff on the development of clear and comprehensive classes of records and personal information banks to identify the Agency’s information holdings in its 2009 submission. A formal communication process between staff of Central Registry of ACOA records and ATIP Division has been established to report the creation of new files that should be included in the Info Source publication.

A working group will be established to address the various information management requirements of the ATIP legislation and TBS requirements (MAF and Implementation Report). Program leads as well as representatives from Information Management and Communications will work with the ATIP Division to achieve this objective.

9. INTERPRETATION OF THE STATISTICAL REPORT ON THE PRIVACY ACT

The following information is provided to assist the reader in the interpretation of the information reported in Annex B.

I: REQUESTS PROCESSED

In light of its legislative mandate, the Agency collects a limited amount of personal information. The Agency’s caseload for 2008 2009 consisted of one access request under the Privacy Act, and no requests were carried forward from the previous year.

II: DISPOSITION OF REQUESTS COMPLETED

In order to respond to the request received, a page-by-page review of 73 pages of records was completed. The records requested were disclosed in part to the requester.

III and IV: EXEMPTIONS INVOKED AND EXCLUSIONS CITED

Sections 26 and 27 were invoked pursuant to the Privacy Act to protect personal information about another individual and to protect solicitor-client privilege information.

Paragraphs 21(1)(b) and (d) of the Access to Information Act were also invoked to protect deliberations between government officials as well as plans relating to the management of personnel that had not yet been put into operation.

V and VI: COMPLETION TIME AND EXTENSIONS

A 30-day extension was invoked pursuant to paragraph 15(a)(ii) of the Act, as consultations were necessary to comply with the request and could not reasonably be completed within the original time limit.

VII: TRANSLATION

The translation of information requested was not required during this fiscal year.

VIII: METHOD OF ACCESS

The Agency provided copies of severed records in response to this privacy request.

IX: CORRECTIONS AND NOTATION

The Agency did not receive any requests for corrections during this fiscal year.

X: COSTS

The cost of administering the Privacy Act, including training sessions, totalled $16,053, consisting of $14,916 in salary costs for 0.24 person-years and $1,136 in administration costs.

ANNEX A

Annex A

 

 

PRIVACY ACT DELEGATION INSTRUMENT

 Section of the Privacy Act

Vice-President, Finance and Corporate Services

Corporate Secretary Coordinator, Access to Information and Privacy
8(2)(j)  Disclose personal information for research purposes

X

X

X

8(2)(m) Disclose personal information in the public interest or in the interest of the individual

X

X

X

8(4)  Retain copy of 8(2)(e) requests and disclosed records

X

X

X

8(5)  Notify Privacy Commissioner of 8(2)(m) disclosures

X

X

X

9(1)  Retain record of use

X

X

X

9(4) Notify Privacy Commissioner of consistent use and amend index

X

X

X

10 Include personal information in personal information banks

X

X

X

14  Respond to request for access within 30 days; give access or give notice

X

X

X

15  Extend time limit for responding to request for access

X

X

X

17(2)(b)  Decide whether to translate requested information

X

X

X

18(2) May refuse to disclose information contained in an exempt bank

X

   
19(1) Shall refuse to disclose information obtained in confidence from another government

X

   
19(2) May disclose any information referred to in 19(1) if the other government consents to the disclosure or makes the information public

X

   
20 May refuse to disclose information injurious to the conduct of federal-provincial affairs

X

   
21 May refuse to disclose information injurious to international affairs or defence

X

   
22 May refuse to disclose information prepared by an investigative body, information injurious to the enforcement of a law, or information injurious to the security of penal institutions

X

   
23 May refuse to disclose information prepared by an investigative body for security clearances

X

   
24 May refuse to disclose information collected by the Canadian Penitentiary Service, the National Parole Service or the National Parole Board while individual was under sentence if conditions in section are met.

X

   
25 May refuse to disclose information which could threaten the safety of individuals

X

   
26 May refuse to disclose information about another individual, and shall refuse to disclose such information where disclosure is prohibited under Section 8

X

   
27 May refuse to disclose information subject to solicitor-client privilege

X

   
28 May refuse to disclose information relating to the individual’s physical or mental health where disclosure is contrary to the best interests of the individual

X

   
31 Receive notice of investigation by the Privacy Commissioner

X

X

X

33(2) Right to make representations to the Privacy Commissioner during an investigation

X

X

X

35(1) Receive Privacy Commissioner’s report of findings of the investigation and give notice of action taken

X

X

X

35(4) Give complainant access to information after 35(1)(b) notice

X

X

X

36(3) Receive Privacy Commissioner’s report of findings of investigation of exempt bank

X

X

X

37(3) Receive report of Privacy Commissioner’s findings after compliance investigation

X

X

X

51(2)(b) Request that Section 51 hearing be held in the National Capital Region

X

X

X

51(3) Request and be given right to make representations in Section 51 hearings

X

X

X

ANNEX B

 

Annex B